Tag Archives: Richmond

…We Now Face Death

Join me in saying goodbye to one of my favorite professors, who unknowingly had a profound impact on my recovery and my life.

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“Having been born in this life as we have been,
we now face death.”

Perdue1

Dr. Daniel Perdue, 1950-2013

That was the very first statement Dr. Dan Perdue made to the religious studies classes he taught. He would go on to explain that, no matter the differences between the many religions of the world, what they all have in common is that they are concerned with what happens to us when we die. His specialty was Tibetan Buddhism, but he also taught general survey classes on eastern religion. He was one of the most interesting, wise, and challenging professors I ever had, and though he never knew it, his classes had an indelible impact on my life and played an important role in my recovery.

When I heard that Dr. Perdue had been diagnosed with pancreatic cancer last year, I and many others wondered how he would face his death. Though he had devoted his academic career and spiritual practice to such questions, no one wants a fatal diagnosis, especially at the age of only 63. As a man who had taught classes the world over and developed many close friendships here in Richmond, he sent out mass emails in August to update everyone on his condition. A friend forwarded me the first one, and I mistakenly thought I had gotten on the mailing list for future emails.

Following his passing on November 18, I re-read the first email and realized he had stated he would send out another. And so it happened that I didn’t read his second email until the day before his memorial service, billed as a Celebration of Life.

I was surprised and touched by what I read. The jovial man whom we all thought incapable of anything but a gentle, happy disposition shared that, in his late twenties and early thirties, he had struggled with substance abuse and depression. In August 2013, he wrote:

I think I did not adequately value my life. I reckon that I wasted nearly a third of it/about 20 years… On many days, especially between the ages of about 27 to 33, I thought of suicide… In time, I gave up on the idea of suicide, but I sort of symbolically threw myself against the wall, drinking and smoking too much and practicing unhealthy habits. Perhaps seeing the scope of what was to come for me, one day completely out of the blue, Kensur Yeshi Thupten said to me, “Toenyoe, happy people don’t drink and take drugs.” But I did. It was a sort of petit suicide, day by day for years.

During his service, someone shared what many of us had all thought at one time or another – a suspicion that Dr. Perdue was actually a bodhisattva, so committed he was to teaching, to the Dharma, and how he built friendships everywhere he went. His apparent struggles with depression and substance abuse made the accomplishments of the second half of his life, as well as his demeanor and attitude, all the more impressive.

Yet I was touched on a much more personal level to hear of the suffering my professor endured, because when I took my first class with him in early 2004, I was suffering immensely.

My eating disorder was arguably at its worst. Truly, I probably should have been in a hospital instead of a dormitory. I was near my lowest weight. I wasn’t sleeping well, and it was in those quiet moments trying to fall asleep at night that the mental chaos and physical pain anorexia had wrought was hardest to escape or ignore. I was miserable, unable to think or function well from the malnourishment. I often thought of suicide. This is not something I have often shared publicly, but in the wake of Dr. Perdue’s last testament, I see no reason to censor this fact.

And so it was that as he began his lecture on eastern religion and the nature of suffering as he always did, there is no way that Dr. Perdue could have known about the Hell I was living in.

“Having been born in this life as we have been, we now face death.”

As he began the introduction to Buddhism, he started with the first of the Four Noble Truths: the truth of suffering, or dukka (dukka is also translated to mean anxiety, stress, and dissatisfaction, among others). The truth of suffering is that we all suffer.

We all endure hardship.
We all get sick.
We all experience loss.
We will all eventually die.

It’s in our nature to try and minimize displeasure and to maximize comfort – human nature is hedonistic on a very basic level. We all put on coats to avoid the discomfort of being cold, for example. If there is one thing that every living thing has in common, it is our capacity to experience suffering.

Perdue went on to explain that, as Buddhism understands the world, there is nothing in our fragile lives that cannot result in suffering – even things that we enjoy or are inherently pleasurable. He offered the examples of ice cream or even sex. Even things that bring us pleasure, done in extreme excess, may result in some mental or physical pain.

I was intrigued. I had never contemplated the world in this way, and one of the support groups I had started attending had a spiritual component that had become a giant roadblock. Others in the group who had a belief in God sailed through it, but my agonistic and at times atheistic disposition seemed incompatible.

Contemplating Dr. Perdue’s words, I slowly began to wonder if there was anything that we could experience in this life, in this world, that we could indulge in that would never result in suffering. If it could be identified, then maybe it could offer me some direction – something bigger, greater than myself that I could take refuge in.

I continued going to the group and attending his classes. Buddhist teaching and recovery programs were not so different: both emphasize, in varying capacities, the practice of compassion towards oneself. While I can only speak for myself, as far as I am concerned, without loving and forgiving oneself, there is no recovery. And self-forgiveness requires that we love ourselves unconditionally. Similarly, a central part of Buddhist practice is learning that compassion, practicing it inward, and then turning it outward. One day, it hit me so hard that I wondered how I never saw it before. I realized that there was something we’re all capable of experiencing and indulging in that will never cause us to suffer.

Unconditional love. Or, to put it another way, love without condition. This means we love others without wanting or expecting anything, including love, in return. This initially feels contrary to human nature, since there isn’t always an immediate or obvious benefit. Sometimes people mistake this idea of love without condition as a circumstance which might allow or encourage someone to stay in an abusive relationship, or to be taken advantage of. This is not the case.

Rather, it allows us to approach individuals and situations with the compassionate understanding that we all suffer. Just as Dr. Perdue had no idea the immense suffering I was experiencing in that first class with him, any person you encounter has their own burden. The positive regard he had for every one he encountered, though, created a circumstance where his compassion and love of life was infectious. He once said that, while he had never had any children of his own, the university gave him more children every semester.

After describing his substance abuse as a petit suicide, Dr. Perdue concluded his email with the following:

…Let me just say what I say at the beginning of the Asian Medical Systems course, “Don’t do as I do. Be smarter than me.” I have never been a model of health or how one should use a good life.

So, please use your life well. It truly is like having a bucket of gold dust with a little hole in the bottom. I know that we tend to see the value in something more, when we are about to lose it. Maybe that’s why I’m saying this stuff to you. But, I have understood the truth of the value of life for a few years now. When I look back over my life now, I see it as one of extraordinary value… How lucky I was! … It will be hard to equal the value of this life.

I cannot help but get a little choked up every time I read that last sentence. If it was not for Dr. Perdue’s class, it’s impossible to say how my recovery would have gone. Ten years since that first class, I only wish now that I could express my gratitude to him.

Despite many hardships, I find myself agreeing with his final sentiment. Though I (hopefully) still have many years, it truly will be hard to equal the value of this life.

Thank you, Dr. Perdue. I’ll see you on the other shore.

You can read Dan Perdue’s full obituary here.

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It’s Already October??

Currently Listening: Nine Inch Nails – Hesitation Marks
Currently Reading: There is No God & He Is Always with You by Brad Warner

Busy, busy, busy! I feel like it’s still May, but apparently it’s already October? I haven’t had much time to do a post, so I thought I’d let everyone know what I’ve been up to and some of the amazing people I’ve had the pleasure of connecting with lately.

In September I spent a long weekend in New York City, and in addition to providing a much needed change of scenery, it afforded me the opportunity to finally meet up with some wonderful friends I’ve been in touch with and/or collaborated with online.

NYC 9-2013

From left to right: Caroline Rothstein, Claire Mysko, my friend Kenny, me, Jenn Friedman, & Kendra Sebelius

If you don’t already know who they are, you should check out their work!

Caroline Rothstein and I had been meaning to try and meet up for awhile now. She’s one of the strongest and most unique voices in eating disorder advocacy I know, turning her own experience with recovery and body acceptance into some powerful work. From writing to blogging to slam poetry, Caroline is a force to be reckoned with. Check out her poem, “Fat” and see for yourself:

Claire Mysko and I were on a segment together on The Stream earlier this year. Claire has made quite a name for herself, getting international attention for her work on body image and body acceptance. An accomplished author, speaker, and consultant, she has served as the director of the American Anorexia Bulimia Association and has held senior positions at SmartGirl and Girls Incorporated. Check out http://clairemysko.com/ to learn more about her work, and definitely check out her recent (and excellent) editorial on The Frisky, The Wolf in the Cereal Bowl.

Jenn Friedman is a musician and eating disorder recovery advocate. She’s been busy working to combine those two passions in a project called “Eating Disorders On the Wire: Music and Metaphor as Pathways to Recovery,” which is supposed to come out really soon!

Kendra Sebelius runs Voice in Recovery, where she focuses on recovery not just from eating disorders, but from substance abuse and addiction as well. Kendra’s own efforts to get sober and recover inform her advocacy work with eating disorders, body image struggles, mental health issues, substance abuse and self harm. She’s also a fellow Junior Board member with the Eating Disorders Coalition.

By the way, we were at TeaNY, one of my favorite NYC spots. All their food is wonderful and the cheesecake is almost worth the trip alone.

Stay tuned for updates from Lobby Day last month, and the NEDA conference!

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Eating Disorders: Not Just a Woman Thing – Huffington Post Live 7/31/13

The only way we’re going to change the landscape of mental health and eating disorders is to keep talking about it, which is why I’m so thrilled that The Huffington Post covers this topic fairly regularly. I joined their live segment on 7/31 along with Dr. Ted Weltzin, and eating disorder survivors Bryan Piperno and Brian Cuban (who’s first book is about to come out – congrats Brian!)

Here’s the full segment:

I took the opportunity to talk about the most important avenues to create change  – policy reform. Men aren’t always included in eating disorder studies for a variety of reasons. Men are less likely to seek help, to be diagnosed with an eating disorder, and most inpatient facilities don’t accept male patients. All of these factors make it harder to actually identify and locate patients to participate in research. That, and most large studies are funded through public money, and currently there are very little research dollars available for eating disorder research.

That’s one of the reasons I’ve been working and volunteering with the Eating Disorders Coalition for the past 7 years. The EDC advocates on Capitol Hill for mental health policy reform, and we always need more people to come and share their stories. If you’ve been  personally impacted by an eating disorder, whether suffering from one personally, watching a loved one struggle, or in your professional life, we want you to join us! Check out http://www.eatingdisorderscoalition.org for more info.

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Interviews with Eating Disorder Advocates – The Kari Adams Show 4/17/13

This past Lobby Day with the Eating Disorders Coalition, Kari Adams of The Kari Adams Show joined us to check out the policy side of the fight against eating disorders. Already a big advocate for positive body image and self-acceptance, Kari was a great fit w/ the EDC. She interviewed a few advocates that were in town, including EDC President Johanna Kandel. Check out the videos below to get a feel for what drives EDC volunteers, why we’re passionate about eating disorders, and what keeps us coming back to Capitol Hill to promote change:


Johanna Kandel is the current President of the Eating Disorders Coalition, founder of the Alliance for Eating Disorders Awareness, and author of Life Beyond Your Eating Disorder.


Suzanne Lewandowski is the founder of the Eating Disorders Collaborative of Massachusetts and a current Junior Board member of the Eating Disorders Coalition.


Seda is the founder of the Cambridge Eating Disorder Center, which offers a spectrum of recovery services including residential and outpatient programs.


Gail is recovered from an eating disorder and the founder of the F.R.E.E.D. Foundation, a fundraiser for treatment scholarships. You can read more about Gail and the foundation here.


We actually don’t know who this guy is. I hear they found him wandering aimlessly around the House of Representatives, clearly sleep-deprived and mumbling something about locating the nearest Metro stop.

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No More Gender Bias – EDC Congressional Briefing, April 2011

In April 2011, I was given the honor of presenting at the Eating Disorders Coalition’s Congressional Briefing. I can’t believe it’s already been two years – this was before I had even started this blog! Until recently, this video (along with the other speakers) had been sitting on a hard drive somewhere, but it’s finally made it online. Below are some excepts, or just scroll to the end for the full video.

I am proof that eating disorders DO NOT discriminate.  It is not a disease of vanity. It is not a “woman’s disease.” It is not a “phase.” It is a life-threatening mental illness epidemic. Despite the data we have that demonstrate that millions of Americans – men and women alike – currently suffer from eating disorders, the shoulder-shrug excuses that are used to trivialize and dismiss eating disorders persist. Despite the fact that upwards of 20% of all anorexics will die as a direct result of their eating disorder, there is a lack of awareness in virtually every level of support that should be there to help someone. From the social level with friends and family, to health care providers, emergency room doctors, and of course, insurance companies.

When I should have been making friends, focusing on school work, and growing into the person I was going to become, I instead lost two years of my life to anorexia, two years of my life that I can’t ever get back. My senior year in high school, I had a falling out with some close friends, and fell into a deep depression. I lost my appetite, and couldn’t sleep. I didn’t know what was happening – everything occurred so quickly. Though I had visibly lost weight, it was a few months after my problems began that I ever bothered weighing myself. Co-workers who didn’t know me well would compliment me on the weight I’d lost. My friends could tell something was wrong, they just didn’t know how to approach it. Not knowing what was wrong myself, when they’d ask if I was OK I would insist that I was fine (a word that a good friend of mine refers to as ‘the real F-word’). Eventually, someone at work asked me how much weight I had lost. The thought hadn’t crossed my mind, and out of sheer curiosity I went home and weighed myself, and my bitter relationship with numbers began.

In those early months I never had ‘goal weights’ or anything else – it was all curiosity. The more I lost, though, and the more my body reflected it, the more I started to wonder how low I could actually get. It’s important to note that, at the time, you could say I was on auto-pilot. I was aware of what I was doing but I was never really in control. Our bodies depend on the intake of food and on regular sleep to function properly, and when deprived of those things your judgment and emotions can get quite disrupted, among other things. I didn’t just wakes up one morning and decide that I was going to be anorexic, any more than one might decide to become a drug addict or to have cancer.

My family and friends could tell something was wrong, but they didn’t know the right questions to ask. I skipped enough classes that my teachers started to worry, too, and even the guidance counselor checked in with me. They could all see I was losing weight very quickly, but they danced around it, wondering if I was depressed or if things were “OK at home”. Maybe they just weren’t used to screening eighteen year-old males for eating disorders. Either way it’s not as if I blame them, I was as clueless as they were. I went through my own denial, listing off all the reasons that I couldn’t be anorexic. “That only happens to models.” “You’ve just been depressed and haven’t felt like eating.” “It’s not that serious, things’ will be OK.”

… My story is not a unique one, and until we have the FREED Act, millions of others will continue to struggle. Children are being exposed to an endless stream of messages and advertising that tells them they should dislike their bodies, and dieting is becoming common among elementary school girls who haven’t even started puberty. This is a problem which is only going to get worse until there is a real intervention on the federal level.

By passing the FREED Act, Congress has the power to give health professionals the tools they need to identify, treat and prevent eating disorders effectively. They have the power to make sure no one has to go through what I went through ever again.

Congress has the power to make sure no one else has to become a statistic. I have friends who are struggling with eating disorders who I’ve encouraged to come to Capitol Hill with me for EDC National Lobby Day. Every day and every month that they don’t get the help they need to recover, I wonder if they’ll be able to make the trip to Capitol Hill with me, or if I’m going to have to bring their picture and memory instead.

And so I’m asking. I’m pleading. Pass the FREED Act. Thank you.


You can access the full speech transcript here.

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Eating Disorder Advocacy in Washington, DC – 4/17/13

I just got back from Washington, DC for another fantastic day of advocacy on Capitol Hill. I’ve been volunteering with the Eating Disorders Coalition (EDC) for six years now, and I’m honored every time to take part in it.

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All photos courtesy of Jim Knapp unless noted.

The EDC advocates for legislative reform to better improve access to treatment, advance research, and educate both professionals and the public about eating disorders. If you or someone you know have ever had to seek treatment, then you know it’s often difficult. This is because of a complicated mix of disputes over diagnosis, established guidelines, and a misunderstanding of eating disorders.

Even though the American Psychiatric Association has compiled very specific and detailed guidelines for treatment, insurance companies have no obligation to follow them and often make up their own guidelines – which physicians often don’t have access to even while treating patients. So even if treatment is approved, it’s hard to know if it will be the kind of comprehensive treatment a particular patient needs.

Jeanine Cogan & Kathleen MacDonald. Jeanine is the EDC Policy Director, Kathleen is the former EDC Policy Assistant.

Jeanine Cogan & Kathleen MacDonald. Jeanine is the EDC Policy Director. Kathleen is the former EDC Policy Assistant and now applies her expertise at Kantor & Kantor LLP.

The legislation the EDC is advocating for is called the Federal Response to the Elimination of Eating Disorders (FREED) Act, and it would help address these problems. It also contains provisions for helping medical professionals know what to look for and how to treat the specific physical health problems that can threaten the lives of eating disorder patients. You can read a full summary of the FREED Act here, along with some background and history here.

[Fun fact: the idea behind FREED, the elimination of eating disorders, was also the inspiration for my blog title!]

The EDC wouldn’t exist if not for the tireless work of the advocates who make up the organization. Spring 2013 marks the first event under the leadership of new EDC President Johanna S. Kandel, author of Life Beyond Your Eating Disorder. A common statement from first-time advocates is often: “What difference does my being here make?”

Well, Johanna came to Capitol Hill ten years ago to lobby with the EDC and got a meeting with her Congressional Representative, Ted Deutch. Their meeting educated him about eating disorders and their severity, as well as putting a human face on them. We can quote statistics all day long, but sometimes a personal testimony says more than amount of data.

Now in 2013, Representative Deutch is championing the FREED Act in the House of Representatives and has made eating disorders a priority during this Congressional session – and it’s all because of Johanna’s hard work and advocacy.

Johanna Kandel (far left) with EDC board members, guest speakers, and Ted Deutch.

Johanna Kandel (far left) with EDC board members, guest speakers, and Ted Deutch.

Myself and Ted Deutch after the briefing. So grateful for his commitment to ending eating disorders & the EDC! (Also, when did my hair get so long??)

Myself and Ted Deutch after the briefing. So grateful for his commitment to FREED & the EDC!
(Also, when did my hair get so long??)

I also want to say thanks to the offices that took the time to meet with the Virginia Team: Senator Mark Warner, Senator Tim Kaine, Representative Bobby Scott, and Representative Morgan Griffith. Virginia is already a leader on eating disorders with HB1406 establishing screenings in public schools, and I’m looking forward to Virginia carrying the torch and seeing our Congressional reps take up the cause!

Our next Lobby Day is September 18, 2013. Even if you can’t make it to DC, there are plenty of ways you can make a difference and advocate for FREED! Consider doing the following:

  • contact the local offices for your Congressional Representatives in your district to meet with them and/or their staff
  • write letters to their offices and share your own stories about how eating disorders have affected your lives, asking them to support FREED
  • donate to the EDC to support their ability to advocate on Capitol Hill, or hold a fundraiser of your own

Shout-out t0 Kari Adams of The Kari Adams Show for making the trip to DC and cover the policy side of eating disorders! Below is an interview she did with Gail Schoenbach, the Executive Director of the F.R.E.E.D. Foundation and current EDC Treasurer, along with some other pictures from Lobby Day!

Some seriously perfect weather on Captiol Hill.

Some seriously perfect weather on Captiol Hill.

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Ran into the Minnesota team on our way to the briefing! (Thanks Britt for the picture!)

Team Leader meeting at the reception the night before. So honored to be working with so many amazing people! Also, I'm the only one with my eyes closed.
Team Leader meeting at the reception the night before. So honored to be working with so many amazing people! Also, I’m the only one with my eyes closed.
EDC President Johanna Kandel introducing the next speaker at the Congressional Briefing.

EDC President Johanna Kandel introducing the next speaker at the Congressional Briefing.

Team leader brainstorming!

Team leader brainstorming!

 

Myself and other advocates during the reception.

Myself and other advocates during the reception.

Full photo sets available on the EDC Facebook page. Videos from the briefing will be made online shortly. For past Lobby Day coverage and testimonials, click here to search for all posts tagged ‘FREED’.

So what are you waiting for? Come join us in Washington, DC and help us END eating disorders!

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Anorexia in Men on the Rise – Huffington Post Live Interview

Happy Eating Disorder Awareness Week! I had the pleasure of participating in a discussion on Huffington Post Live on eating disorders in men this past Thursday. I’m excited that they chose to highlight this subject during awareness week, and appreciate the thoughtful questions they had for everyone on the segment.

You can watch the full segment below, which includes a young man named Alberto De Leon in Chicago who is currently in recovery from an eating disorder; Margaret Johnson, the editor for HuffPost Women; Amanda Webster, an Australian mother who’s son developed anorexia in childhood; and Dr. Gregory Jantz, an eating disorder specialist in Seattle. You can watch the full video below:

You may notice that the title on the video says, “Manorexia on the Rise.” Well, I don’t care for that term one bit, and I’m happy to report that when I emailed my contact on the production team, they changed it on the main video page and wherever else it was possible. Unfortunately, it’s much harder to edit out of the video stream, but I want to extend my gratitude for the quick response they had in changing it where they could.

I’ve written about my disdain for that term in the past:

If you’ve been keeping up with me on here, you have probably heard me talk about “gender inclusivity.” I believe for ED treatment, research, and prevention to advance, it has to be fully inclusive and not just catered to the majority. I almost slipped through the cracks of the resources available to me during my own recovery because it was all designed for women, and I mourn for other boys and men who find themselves in similar circumstances.

I grimaced at the original title because taking a word like “anorexia” and altering it to reference EDs in men carries the implication that men experience it differently in some way – otherwise, they would just call it anorexia, right? …In short, it by default is not gender inclusive.

It won’t do us any good to take notice of how our recovery culture is feminized if we just turn around and make it gendered in the opposite direction. Eating disorders are, more than anything, a matter of public health concern.

Thanks again to Huffington Post Live for having me, and for responding to my request regarding the segment title so quickly. If more media outlets handled this issue with the same level of care, we’d all be the better for it.

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Quick Updates

Currently Listening: Murder by Death – Bitter Drink, Bitter Moon

It’s National Eating Disorder Awareness Week! Normally I try to have a ton of stuff to post and share, but life has been pretty crazy right now. If I did everything I wanted to do, I’d need about twelve more hours in the day and at least an eight day week!

Which is kind of a salient point for talking about NEDAW. Taking on more than you can handle or have time for can be a recipe for disaster, and I learned a long time ago that sometimes you just gotta let some things go.

Have you heard of NORMAL in Schools? They promote positive body image and eating disorder education  with a special focus on schools and universities. I’m now contributing to their blog about once a month, which means I will occasionally be dividing my writing between this site and theirs. My first post is about one of my favorite topics – gender inclusivity! It’s adapted in part from a seminar paper I worked on last year which discusses the gendering of eating disorder recovery culture:

Maybe you’ve never considered the idea that we have a gendered recovery culture. As a male who suffered from anorexia, though, I know it all too well. To create space and dialogue which is gender-inclusive means we need to examine the reasons that negative body image and eating disorders have historically been associated with women or regarded as a “women’s problem.” Given that it’s Eating Disorder Awareness Week, this seems a fitting topic. After all, we have a huge recovery culture which has a cursory awareness of eating disorders in males but rarely includes them in a visible way.
-from ‘What the Heck is Gender Inclusivity?

While you’re there, check out other great contributors like Robyn Farrell, Caroline Rothstein, Becky Henry, and Carolin Costyn! I must say, it’s seriously an honor to have my writing appearing alongside so many other awesome voices.

Stay tuned for more updates for NEDAW 2013. What are you doing this week to educate and advocate for eating disorders? For yourself?

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Public Perception of Eating Disorders – Huffington Post Live

In case you missed it last night, I had a last-minute invitation by the Huffington Post to join a discussion on the public perception of eating disorders! Also featured in the video are Claire Glass, a blogger who recently shared a story about her grandmtother’s life-long eating disorder, and two treatment professionals, Kim Dennis and Laura Discipio.

You can watch below:

Claire’s story is particularly moving and important, since, along with people “like me” who don’t fit the stereotypical perception of who can have an eating disorder, elderly people are often underrepresented or invisible in the conversation. You can read the full write-up about her grandmother here.

Special thanks to Jenny Churchill and everyone at Huffington Post Live for handling this subject so seriously and taking the time to talk about it! Responsible journalism is incredibly important when talking about eating disorders, because it’s already such a sensitive subject that it can be easy to make sensationalist stories which have shock value but lack substance. Both for this segment and another article I was interviewed for last year, they have an excellent track record!

PS – I’m on Google+ now. I don’t quite get it yet, but don’t let that stop you from adding me to your circles or squares.

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Eating Disorders Coalition Spring Lobby Day 2012!

Do you know what the FREED Act is? It’s the Federal Response to the Elimination of Eating Disorders, and it’s a bill that we need YOUR help to pass.

For over a decade, the Eating Disorders Coalition (EDC) has been active on Capitol Hill working with the federal government to help make eating disorders a federal health priority. With the highest mortality rate of any mental health disorder, we need a bill like the FREED Act to help those who suffer from eating disorders get the help they need and deserve.

I’ve been volunteering with the EDC for 5 years now, and am currently a Junior Board member. Sometimes people ask me if I really think lobbying is worth it because of how complicated and partisan politics can be. I’ll admit, it can be discouraging. But those in office really do pay attention and listen to people who take time out of their lives to come and discuss issues with them. There’s so much misinformation out there about eating disorders that we need people who have had real-world experience with them to come and educate lawmakers. Putting a face and a name to a real story goes a lot farther than any statistics, no matter how shocking or upsetting they might be.

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