Tag Archives: activism

Review: Against Me!’s Transgender Dysphoria Blues

against-me-transgener-dsphoria-blues-1389381288I’ve never reviewed any music on my blog before, but then again there haven’t been any records by bands I listen to that have mattered as much as this one. Punk has never quite lived up to its promise of being all-inclusive and all-accepting; sexism and homophobia have always been problems just as they are in other subcultures and societies. Maybe that’s why I find the candid honesty of Against Me!’s frontwoman, Laura Jane Grace, about her identity (and the concept album she’s written about it) so refreshing. It doesn’t feel like it was over year and a half ago when she came out as transgender and intent to start hormone replacement therapy, but here we are: it’s 2014 and the album is only now out.

Rough Surf on the Coast
Grace has always written about gender dysphoria in her music (see ‘Violence’ on Searching for a Former Clarity, ‘The Ocean’ of New Wave, and ‘Bamboo Bones’ on White Crosses to name a few), but never in such a personal, obvious, or unapologetic way. While other public figures with a pop culture status have had somewhat public transitions, Grace stands out since she spends more than half of a given year on tour, on stage, performing music and meeting fans. Short of putting her musical career on hold and withdrawing from the public eye to transition privately, there wasn’t really any other way to go about it but to be as up front as possible.

In terms of trans* visibility, it’s pretty significant. There are many strong voices who are very open about who they are, but Grace’s presence, visibility, and accessibility in the music scene over the past fifteen years makes her stand out more than others. Since Against Me! never became so huge that they stopped playing club shows, it’s typically been easy to talk to the band after a set and say hello – despite a brief major label stint that resulted in some more mainstream commercial success.

Both Grace herself and the record, Transgender Dysphoria Blues, matter in part for their degree of visibility. Continue reading

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2013 Year in Review

Currently reading: A Queer History of the United State by Micheal Bronski
Currently listening: Bubblegum by Kevin Devine

Another year over. If you’re new around here, this may be a great way to get acquainted! Here’s a handful of my favorite posts from the past year, along with some other developments.

March 1, 2013: Anorexia in Men on the Rise
I started off last year with a few segments discussing eating disorders in boys and men. I keep saying it, but it’s still true: I’m very grateful to the Huffington Post for their continued coverage and interest in the subject!

April 10, 2013: Striving For Perfection – Boys & Body Image
Another segment, this one with Al Jazeera English, where we were joined by my friend Claire Mysko and some other great panelists. Appreciate the good questions and discussion we had, check it out!

April 21, 2013: No More Gender Bias
I finally got a hold of the recording of the speech I gave in 2011 at the EDC Spring Congressional Briefing. Very honored to participate. You can watch the full thing at the link above, along with the full transcript.

April 19, 2013: Eating Disorder Advocacy in Washington DC
April saw another Lobby Day on Capitol Hill. I’ve been going twice a year for over seven years, and it’s still the most important thing I’ve done. Educating Congress and reforming health laws to meet the needs of people with eating disorders has the potential to help millions and save lives. Kari Adams of the Kari Adams Show was there with us, and she did a couple of interviews with people from the EDC about the work we do in DC.

December 7, 2013: …We Now Face Death
In November, one of my favorite professors died of pancreatic cancer. He never knew it, but he had a profound impact on my life and my recovery. In case you don’t have time to read it, at least heed some of his last words in the final email he sent out:

So, please use your life well. It truly is like having a bucket of gold dust with a little hole in the bottom. I know that we tend to see the value in something more, when we are about to lose it. Maybe that’s why I’m saying this stuff to you. But, I have understood the truth of the value of life for a few years now. When I look back over my life now, I see it as one of extraordinary value… How lucky I was! … It will be hard to equal the value of this life.

We should all be so lucky to look back on our lives and see the extraordinary value in them. RIP, Dr. Perdue.

In 2013:

We also had to say goodbye to Matt Ryd, who lost his battle with depression and eating disorders.

There were a number of policy achievements on the federal level:
-Health and Human Services released the final rulings for the 2008 parity law, which has important implications for patients with eating disorders, including the requirement for insurance companies to make available the criteria by which they deem treatment “not medically necessary!”

-The EDC put together a report on the benchmark plans for the state exchanges through the Affordable Care Act to see what benefits might potentially help people with eating disorders.

-The National Eating Disorders Association had a very successful Lobby Day as well!

And finally… here’s my own 2013 in pictures. I went to Brazil, I finally met face to face with some fellow ED activists, I finished the Gender Studies program I was in, won an award from the Virginia Social Science Association for a paper on eating disorders and health policy, and a whole lot more!

NEDA 2013 with Benjamin O'Keefe and Brian Cuban

NEDA 2013 with Benjamin O’Keefe and Brian Cuban

Award reception with Dr. Tim Brazil of the Virginia Social Science Association, April 2013

Award reception with Dr. Tim Brazil of the Virginia Social Science Association, April 2013

NYC 9-2013

Meeting with lovely friends and activists: Caroline Rothstein, Claire Mysko, Jenn Friedman, and Kendra Sebelius

Flying over Rio on the way to Salvador

Flying over Rio on the way to Salvador

Presenting at the University of Virginia, November 2013

Presenting at the University of Virginia, November 2013

Visiting friends in Asheville

Visiting friends in Asheville December 2013

Tomorrow is always a new day, and eventually it’s a new year. Here’s to 2014.

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Should NEDIC Reconsider Their Ad Campaign?

Update:
NEDIC put out a response for which I’m appreciative (see here). Perhaps my rhetoric was a little over-the-top, but I do feel strongly about these things and believe they must be treated with the utmost care (see the comments section for further discussion). The nature of the internet can sometimes blow things out of proportion, and I hope that hasn’t happened here. To borrow a phrase from one commenter, I’d never want to ‘silence an ally’ and NEDIC does some extremely important work!

Original Post:
The following photo shows an ad that the National Eating Disorder Information Center is currently running on subways to attempt to get people talking about eating disorders and make them aware of local resources. But am I the only one who has a problem with it?

NEDIC

In response to some initial critique, NEDIC (at least, whoever runs NEDIC’s Facebook page) issued the following replies:

“It does say Hunger is my bff- it is meant to shock, leave an impression and encourage dialogue. Thank you for the feedback and engaging with us.”

…Is the image controversial? Polarizing even? Yes, but as long as it makes people think about it, and talk about it, we feel we have made progress in making more people aware of available resources and support- our end goal. This is our first such campaign and we will be doing market research to gauge reaction on-the-street, and how the campaign is being perceived by the general public. All information will be used to deliver more effective campaigns in the future…”

Where to start?

They actually stated that this is their first such campaign and are doing market research to gauge reactions. Did no one think that perhaps that feedback could have been garnered online via activist communities or opinion polls? In other words, they’re beta-testing this idea to the general populous.

Worse, I have a problem with that whole “as long as it makes people think about it… we feel we have made progress.”

See…

In some situations, I agree, but this is not a “no press is bad press” type situation. When dealing with something deadly like an eating disorder, an ad that (not-so-clearly) aims to satirize the behaviors of disordered eating comes off as trivializing the issue for people who are suffering from EDs and confusing passerby who don’t get it. When going for “on-the-street” reactions you have a responsibility to be concerned about the affects of your message on a general population, and this doesn’t meet that criteria.

You know what’s even more attention-getting? Statistics like the fact that eating disorders have the highest mortality rate of any mental health disorder, upwards of 20% of anorexics WILL DIE as a direct result of their eating disorder.

If you were an advocacy organization that campaigned against self-harm or suicide, would you put a similar “controversial and polarizing” message up to turn heads, like “Cutting is my BFF”? I’d certainly hope not.

This campaign is as vapid and harmful as those Urban Outfitters shirts that say “Eat Less.” There is honestly no difference, and whoever thought this up should reconsider what they put out into the world and whether or not this actually helps more people than it harms.

Eating disorders are deadly disorders, and this ad makes a mockery of the families that I have met doing lobby work who have lost loved ones to these terrible illnesses.

To be clear, I love 99% of the images on their page and it looks like they generally do good and important work. As an outspoken and passionate eating disorder activist, I love to see other people and ‘orgs trying to reach out to others. But this particular campaign doesn’t cut it, and hiding behind statements like “Yes, it’s shocking, let’s talk about that” doesn’t cut it, either.

Seriously. Do your “market research” internally or with the population you hope to reach out to. I can think of many forums and groups that would be happy to assist in providing feedback before you pay money to put up harmful ads on subways.

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In Loving Memory of Matt Ryd, Musician & Eating Disorder Activist

Last year at the end of Eating Disorder Awareness Week, I stumbled on another guy named Matt, a musician from Chicago who also suffered from an eating disorder. He had made a really touching video for ED Awareness Week, and all proceeds from his music sales for the entire week were being donated to the National Eating Disorders Association.

MattRyd

I had a brief correspondence with him over email, mainly to tell him how much I loved the video he had made, and to ask him if he would ever consider coming to DC to do advocacy work with me and the Eating Disorders Coalition. I’m often one of the only guys there, but I know there are others. I’ve met them, we’ve networked online, and we’ve all seen the limited statistics that are available that still unequivocally demonstrate that an eating disorder is a serious, life-threatening illness, regardless of the sex or gender of the person suffering from it. We need more male representation on Capitol Hill to reflect the actual population affected, and I was excited to be in touch with such a passionate and caring guy like him.

Matt had told me he wasn’t sure he could afford traveling all the way to DC, but would like to in the future if possible. As I’ve been prepping for the Fall 2013 day in DC, he was on my short list of people to email and check in with. Instead, this evening I found that his family left the following comment on the post from last year:

Matt Ryd has passed away.

From his parents on his Facebook Page:

Message from Matt’s Parents to all Matt’s wonderful friends and supporters:

It is with very heavy hearts that we must tell you that Matt lost his battle with the anxiety, depression and eating disorder that had consumed him for so long and ended his physical life here on earth on Sunday, August 4th. While Matt fought vigorously for many years, his illnesses had grown more and more debilitating over the past 18 months or so, and though he tried hard not to show it, his daily suffering increased significantly and was ultimately more than he could bear. Our hearts are broken, but we take comfort in the knowledge that he has finally been “Healed” and will suffer no more.

Matt was an amazing young man with many talents, but most importantly he had a sensitive spirit and heart of gold and touched people’s lives all around him. In true Matt Ryd fashion, he left an open message for his friends, fans and others who supported his dream of being a musician that he asked us to share with all of you. His message reads as follows:

********************************************************************
“To all the people who have taken time to listen to my music and support my dream, even though it stops here before I become a big shot and get to prove that I won’t lose touch with my frans: Thank you. Thank you for the joy that you brought into my life. Because there have been absolutely no times that I have been happier than when I’ve been onstage, than when I’ve watched comments roll in on YouTube videos, or when I’ve had simple Facebook conversations with people halfway around the world. You are all wonderful and amazing and I thank you so so much for your time and your attention. I’m just happy that I’ve been able to make any impact in your lives. I truly regret that the music has to stop along with me.”

********************************************************************
Matt lived to write and play music and was always overwhelmed and humbled by the tremendous support that he received from so many of you. Thank you to all of you for being a part of his life and providing him with such unbridled joy in the midst of all of his struggles. He will be missed greatly by us all, but we think his passion for music will continue on – in the words and lyrics of the other wonderfully talented singer/songwriters that play nightly across the Chicago landscape and beyond – and we know that is what he would want.

There will be a memorial service in a few weeks to celebrate Matt’s life and the music he loved so dearly in a way that he would have wanted. More information will be posted as it is determined. Matt also very humbly requested that any remembrances be made to either ANAD (www.anad.org) or NEDA (www.neda.org) which are two eating disorder support organizations that were important part of Matt’s life for many years.

Thank you again for the part that each of you played in Matt’s life. We will always cherish the happy moments and memories that being a musician provided for Matt over the years.

Steve and Joani Ryd

Right now I can’t even read through the entire message because I’m crying too hard. I want to watch the video again that he made last year, but the moment the music comes on I know I can’t.

On March 5, 2013, he shared the following message on his Facebook page:

Hey everyone,

As National Eating Disorder Awareness Week has drawn to its close, and having finished an overwhelmingly successful fundraiser (for which I owe you all of the credit), I feel like the time is right to make an announcement.

I’m going back into residential treatment for my own eating disorder for a while. Actually, I’ve been in residential for the past week, but didn’t want to distract from the fundraiser until it was complete.

Some of you are probably thinking: “Wait a second… wasn’t he *just* in residential treatment?” Well… yes and no. Yes, I left residential treatment about 5 months ago when my insurance ran out. 5 months is a relatively short amount of time, but can also be an eternity when you’re left with unresolved issues. In my case, as the eating disorder symptoms stopped being a problem, that led to intense anxiety. That anxiety, in turn, led to a pretty bad bout of depression. And that depression led me to turn back to my eating disorder.

In technical terms, I relapsed. It’s not uncommon. Statistics vary, but it’s generally believed that somewhere around 50% of patients tend to relapse in their first year after spending time at an inpatient/residential facility. Unfortunately, though I tried very hard not to fall under this statistic, as I’ve said before: eating disorders are sneaky little bastards, and they can come creeping in and take over your life before you even know it is happening.

I have no clue how long this stay will be. I do know that, this time, I’m staying here until I’ve worked through the underlying issues that lead me to turn to my disorder. Last time, I essentially cured the symptoms without fixing the disease. Or, to get all metaphorical on you, I tore up the weeds in the garden without managing to dig up the roots, and, as is expected, the weeds grew back.

In the meantime, I’ll obviously be taking a hiatus from music and production while in the recovery process. But I’ll also be taking a sabbatical from social networks (Facebook, Twitter, my blog… and I’ll try really really hard not to Instagram the pictures my parents send me of my cat). I’ll do my best to respond to personal messages on any of those platforms, but I won’t be responding to or making any wall posts, @ replies, or anything like that.

But I’m not dropping off the face of the earth. If you’d like to reach me for any reason, I’ll still be checking and doing my best to respond to emails at matt@mattryd.com. If you have my personal cell phone number, I’ll be doing my best to respond to any texts that I get, and if you don’t have my personal cell, you can text my work phone at (773) 980-6793. I do have to emphasize that I will *try* (and will try very very hard) to respond to everything. But, just to put things in perspective, I have *very* little free time, so I apologize in advance if some communication falls through the cracks. I promise, I will read everything, and that emails and texts from the outside world are greatly appreciated, as I’m a little bit sequestered at the moment.

Let me just say thank you to you all for your support and for sticking by me during my struggles. I promise that, when the time is right and when I am healthy, I will be back, and will be better than ever. I’ll be putting out albums left and right, producing like crazy, hanging out with as many of you as possible… and best of all, I’ll be doing it without an eating disorder. If you thought that I was able to do cool stuff before, just wait until you see me when I’m healthy. I plan to be a force to be reckoned with.

I love you all dearly, and will miss you while I’m gone, but I know that this is for the best. And when it’s all done, you’ll have an even better Matt than you’ve ever had before. And hopefully that’s something for us all to look forward to.

Your friend,
Matt

Even though we never met, I felt a connection to Matt. I think it was his sincerity and honesty, even while he was struggling. I could just tell that his candidness and hopefulness were going to give others hope, too, and maybe the impetus to seek their own recovery and support.

So if you’re reading this and you’re struggling, or you know someone who is: it’s time to do something about it. Eating disorders are serious, deadly illnesses, and you (and me, and Matt, and everyone) deserve to be healthy and happy.

Here’s the video that Matt made again. Please watch it, and share this with anyone who needs to hear it.

I wish I could have met you. Rest in peace, Matt.

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Eating Disorders: Not Just a Woman Thing – Huffington Post Live 7/31/13

The only way we’re going to change the landscape of mental health and eating disorders is to keep talking about it, which is why I’m so thrilled that The Huffington Post covers this topic fairly regularly. I joined their live segment on 7/31 along with Dr. Ted Weltzin, and eating disorder survivors Bryan Piperno and Brian Cuban (who’s first book is about to come out – congrats Brian!)

Here’s the full segment:

I took the opportunity to talk about the most important avenues to create change  - policy reform. Men aren’t always included in eating disorder studies for a variety of reasons. Men are less likely to seek help, to be diagnosed with an eating disorder, and most inpatient facilities don’t accept male patients. All of these factors make it harder to actually identify and locate patients to participate in research. That, and most large studies are funded through public money, and currently there are very little research dollars available for eating disorder research.

That’s one of the reasons I’ve been working and volunteering with the Eating Disorders Coalition for the past 7 years. The EDC advocates on Capitol Hill for mental health policy reform, and we always need more people to come and share their stories. If you’ve been  personally impacted by an eating disorder, whether suffering from one personally, watching a loved one struggle, or in your professional life, we want you to join us! Check out http://www.eatingdisorderscoalition.org for more info.

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Interviews with Eating Disorder Advocates – The Kari Adams Show 4/17/13

This past Lobby Day with the Eating Disorders Coalition, Kari Adams of The Kari Adams Show joined us to check out the policy side of the fight against eating disorders. Already a big advocate for positive body image and self-acceptance, Kari was a great fit w/ the EDC. She interviewed a few advocates that were in town, including EDC President Johanna Kandel. Check out the videos below to get a feel for what drives EDC volunteers, why we’re passionate about eating disorders, and what keeps us coming back to Capitol Hill to promote change:


Johanna Kandel is the current President of the Eating Disorders Coalition, founder of the Alliance for Eating Disorders Awareness, and author of Life Beyond Your Eating Disorder.


Suzanne Lewandowski is the founder of the Eating Disorders Collaborative of Massachusetts and a current Junior Board member of the Eating Disorders Coalition.


Seda is the founder of the Cambridge Eating Disorder Center, which offers a spectrum of recovery services including residential and outpatient programs.


Gail is recovered from an eating disorder and the founder of the F.R.E.E.D. Foundation, a fundraiser for treatment scholarships. You can read more about Gail and the foundation here.


We actually don’t know who this guy is. I hear they found him wandering aimlessly around the House of Representatives, clearly sleep-deprived and mumbling something about locating the nearest Metro stop.

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No More Gender Bias – EDC Congressional Briefing, April 2011

In April 2011, I was given the honor of presenting at the Eating Disorders Coalition’s Congressional Briefing. I can’t believe it’s already been two years – this was before I had even started this blog! Until recently, this video (along with the other speakers) had been sitting on a hard drive somewhere, but it’s finally made it online. Below are some excepts, or just scroll to the end for the full video.

I am proof that eating disorders DO NOT discriminate.  It is not a disease of vanity. It is not a “woman’s disease.” It is not a “phase.” It is a life-threatening mental illness epidemic. Despite the data we have that demonstrate that millions of Americans – men and women alike – currently suffer from eating disorders, the shoulder-shrug excuses that are used to trivialize and dismiss eating disorders persist. Despite the fact that upwards of 20% of all anorexics will die as a direct result of their eating disorder, there is a lack of awareness in virtually every level of support that should be there to help someone. From the social level with friends and family, to health care providers, emergency room doctors, and of course, insurance companies.

When I should have been making friends, focusing on school work, and growing into the person I was going to become, I instead lost two years of my life to anorexia, two years of my life that I can’t ever get back. My senior year in high school, I had a falling out with some close friends, and fell into a deep depression. I lost my appetite, and couldn’t sleep. I didn’t know what was happening – everything occurred so quickly. Though I had visibly lost weight, it was a few months after my problems began that I ever bothered weighing myself. Co-workers who didn’t know me well would compliment me on the weight I’d lost. My friends could tell something was wrong, they just didn’t know how to approach it. Not knowing what was wrong myself, when they’d ask if I was OK I would insist that I was fine (a word that a good friend of mine refers to as ‘the real F-word’). Eventually, someone at work asked me how much weight I had lost. The thought hadn’t crossed my mind, and out of sheer curiosity I went home and weighed myself, and my bitter relationship with numbers began.

In those early months I never had ‘goal weights’ or anything else – it was all curiosity. The more I lost, though, and the more my body reflected it, the more I started to wonder how low I could actually get. It’s important to note that, at the time, you could say I was on auto-pilot. I was aware of what I was doing but I was never really in control. Our bodies depend on the intake of food and on regular sleep to function properly, and when deprived of those things your judgment and emotions can get quite disrupted, among other things. I didn’t just wakes up one morning and decide that I was going to be anorexic, any more than one might decide to become a drug addict or to have cancer.

My family and friends could tell something was wrong, but they didn’t know the right questions to ask. I skipped enough classes that my teachers started to worry, too, and even the guidance counselor checked in with me. They could all see I was losing weight very quickly, but they danced around it, wondering if I was depressed or if things were “OK at home”. Maybe they just weren’t used to screening eighteen year-old males for eating disorders. Either way it’s not as if I blame them, I was as clueless as they were. I went through my own denial, listing off all the reasons that I couldn’t be anorexic. “That only happens to models.” “You’ve just been depressed and haven’t felt like eating.” “It’s not that serious, things’ will be OK.”

… My story is not a unique one, and until we have the FREED Act, millions of others will continue to struggle. Children are being exposed to an endless stream of messages and advertising that tells them they should dislike their bodies, and dieting is becoming common among elementary school girls who haven’t even started puberty. This is a problem which is only going to get worse until there is a real intervention on the federal level.

By passing the FREED Act, Congress has the power to give health professionals the tools they need to identify, treat and prevent eating disorders effectively. They have the power to make sure no one has to go through what I went through ever again.

Congress has the power to make sure no one else has to become a statistic. I have friends who are struggling with eating disorders who I’ve encouraged to come to Capitol Hill with me for EDC National Lobby Day. Every day and every month that they don’t get the help they need to recover, I wonder if they’ll be able to make the trip to Capitol Hill with me, or if I’m going to have to bring their picture and memory instead.

And so I’m asking. I’m pleading. Pass the FREED Act. Thank you.


You can access the full speech transcript here.

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Public Perception of Eating Disorders – Huffington Post Live

In case you missed it last night, I had a last-minute invitation by the Huffington Post to join a discussion on the public perception of eating disorders! Also featured in the video are Claire Glass, a blogger who recently shared a story about her grandmtother’s life-long eating disorder, and two treatment professionals, Kim Dennis and Laura Discipio.

You can watch below:

Claire’s story is particularly moving and important, since, along with people “like me” who don’t fit the stereotypical perception of who can have an eating disorder, elderly people are often underrepresented or invisible in the conversation. You can read the full write-up about her grandmother here.

Special thanks to Jenny Churchill and everyone at Huffington Post Live for handling this subject so seriously and taking the time to talk about it! Responsible journalism is incredibly important when talking about eating disorders, because it’s already such a sensitive subject that it can be easy to make sensationalist stories which have shock value but lack substance. Both for this segment and another article I was interviewed for last year, they have an excellent track record!

PS – I’m on Google+ now. I don’t quite get it yet, but don’t let that stop you from adding me to your circles or squares.

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The Sun’s Always Rising in the Sky Somewhere

Currently Listening: Against Me!: The Disco Before the Breakdown

I recently talked about how punk rock and sobriety had a big effect on my life, and the appeal that punk had because of its foundational ideals of acceptance of all people. Black, white, gay, straight, fat, skinny – there wasn’t any room for to judge people over such superficial things.

That doesn’t mean people didn’t bring their own prejudices and insecurities into radical or punk communities. It’s easy to say, “We stand for this,” but being ‘not prejudiced’ against a given group or type of person isn’t as simple as saying you aren’t racist/homophobic/transphobic/sexist and then denying all responsibility when you end up doing or saying something which actually happens to be prejudiced.

That’s because not acting or thinking in prejudicial ways is a process that evolves as we erode our own ignorance. You can be well-intentioned in your ideas and words, but that doesn’t always mean you don’t do or say anything that isn’t offensive to someone – particularly something you have zero exposure to or experience with.

This week sees one well-known punk musician coming out in a very public way over a matter which will put a lot of these issues to the test. Tom Gabel of the band Against Me! (yeah, they spell it with an exclamation mark) has a six page interview in this week’s Rolling Stone coming out as transgendered. She (Tom) will be changing her name to Laura Jane Grace and doing hormone therapy. She and her wife will remain together. It’s all over the internet already, so I won’t bother repeating all the same details that are available everywhere else.

Continue reading

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In Remembrance: Reanna’s Story

In my last post about Lobby Day, I mentioned a story shared at the Congressional Briefing by mother Tracy Smith, who’s daughter Reanna died from her eating disorder while waiting for treatment. Tracy has agreed to let me share her testimony here to further spread the truth about the severity and life threatening reality of eating disorders. I’m deeply grateful to Tracy for her courage and willingness to share this story, and hope that others will learn from it. 

Please note that some of the specifics regarding her daughter’s death may be difficult to hear and are rather emotional, and if you are in recovery from an eating disorder, please take care of yourself while reading.

The following speech was given by Tracy Smith on Capitol Hill on April 24, 2012, at a Congressional Briefing held by the Eating Disorders Coalition as testimony to advocate for the passage of the Federal Response to Eliminate Eating Disorders (FREED) Act.

Tracy Smith testifies on behalf of her daughter.

It has been seventeen months since my baby was taken.

My Family has been devastated by an eating disorder in the worst way possible. On Nov 15, 2010, my Daughter lost her life to an eating disorder. In less than twenty-three months this disease came into our lives and took over my child. Physically, mentally emotionally and in every aspect that you can imagine. Due to misdiagnoses by her pediatrician, lack of education and no coverage for her condition by medical insurance we were alone in the very short battle!

This is Reanna Yvette’s Story.

Continue reading

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